Adjusting the Forward Lean on the Highback

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Adjusting the Forward Lean on the Highback

Postby SteveH » Wed Dec 19, 2007 10:03 pm

Most bindings have a slider on the back of the highback that allows you to adjust the forward lean angle. Moving the slider down forces the top of the highback further forward, increasing lean.

I was vaguely aware of this, but really hadn't paid much attention to it. A few days ago I took a good look at the adjustment. The front binding had a couple of degrees of lean and the back was at zero. I have no idea how they got set up this way. I guess there could be situations in which you would use different angles for each leg, but it seemed odd to me.

Since I was still having issues with good edging on the heelside I decided to adjust both bindings to 4. The change was astounding! I immediately felt much greater control and a better posture on the heelside. I also had much less trouble with a tail washout that has plagued my heelside turns.

Both changes made perfect sense. The lesser lean on the rear leg meant I was getting less edge angle of the tail of the board, contributing to the washout. Increasing the lean across the entire board let me get the heelside edge engaged with much less body lean.

If you have issues with your heelside turns (anybody not have issues with their heelside turns?) I encourage you to experiment with the forward lean adjustment. It may make a huge difference in your riding.

Steve
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Postby canoer » Wed Dec 19, 2007 10:26 pm

Sounds like a great tip - I've had the heelside washout issue and never related it to the highback angle. Thanks!
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Postby bernwern » Thu Dec 20, 2007 10:29 am

Yes, forward lean is a huge factor.

I have now adjusted mine to 12° on both bindings, and I find i can make much quicker carves. I can also ride deeper into them without chatter.

Try some experimenting, as I am sure everyone can gain some from this.

-B
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Highbacks

Postby yardsale » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:23 pm

Good stuff. I have also found it helpful to rotate the heel cups on the highback towards the heelside edge. I am not sure if all bindings have this adjustment.
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Postby MunkySpunk » Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:04 pm

That's a problem I've been having too. I can nail the heel-to-toe pretty fast, but the toe-to-heel takes more of a lean for me and therefore is slower in happening. Thanks for the advice!!
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Postby MunkySpunk » Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:07 pm

I finally got to try this last night.

Wow.. what a difference in board response, snap quick and reliable. I had no problem nailing toe-to-heel as fast as I needed all of a sudden. The change was like night and day. As for the specific angles used.. I have no idea, my highbacks aren't marked with graduations, and any use of a protractor or the Pythagorean theorum would just be an approximation. Suffice to say, the moment I was in the binding, I felt the highback pressing lightly against the back of my legs through the boot while I was just standing there. I was kind of afraid that I overdid it, but I went down the hill anyway, figuring the worst that could happen is I bite it a couple of times and fix the angle at the bottom. But it turns out it's just fine for my own style.

I went from shifting my whole weight to link a turn to pretty much boarding from the waist down with nicely bent knees in one night.

My highbacks are each at the same setting, but I feel the front highback pressing more than the rear one, for whatever that's worth to anyone reading this.

Thanks for the tip, it's made a big difference!!
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Postby bernwern » Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:44 am

I tried 15° last nite...bad idea >< I quickly reverted to 12° and was back to normal. I think the sweet spot is as Munky described: strapped in with the back pressing firmly on your boot (but not uncomfortably).

Munky: differences in pressure from forward lean can be cause by 2 things:
1) stance angles-if your front foot is angled wide and your body is perpendicular, it may rub differently.
2) where you weight your turns-there are many ways to turn, but most will lean on the front foot and torsion the board, so this could be part of it.

-B
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Postby canoer » Thu Jan 24, 2008 1:04 am

This is the best tip I've gotten in a couple of years. I cranked my Flows forward about 5 trips ago and my heelside turns on my stiff board were much more dialed in. Then we got some freshies and I grabbed my softer board with the old Burtons with the heelbacks mostly perpendicular. They didn't feel right!

I set the Burtons forward that night and the next day my heelside carves were sticking much nicer.

I do need to tinker with the binding plate on the softer board and move it back a hair 'cause my toe is dragging a bit now. Or maybe just pivot the heelback a bit. (Riding duck 15° for all bindings fwiw).

Thanks Steve - what tip are you going to offer next to top this? :D
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Postby SteveH » Mon Jan 28, 2008 1:28 pm

Thanks for all the excellent feedback. I'm really glad to hear this has helped other folks as much as it has me.

Steve
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