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What To Wear Under Boarding Pants

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:39 pm
by kenshapiro2002
On lesson #3 tomorrow. So far, I've worn thermal underwear (long), jeans, and cheap plastic rain gear over the jeans (and sweating). Well, just got a pair of Bonfire Fragment pants that seem very warm. What do you generally wear under these things?
Ken

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:55 pm
by wrathfuldeity
PNW is usually wet/damp, so absoutely no cotton...always wicking base layer, fleece or wool/merino and gortex 20,000/20,000mm due to rain potential.

cold days 0-20 deg F...Patagonia Capilene + gortex shell

warm 20+ deg f....fleece shorts +gortex shell

hot 40+ deg f sunny ...shorts only...no snow shell pants

My first ghetto was nylon shell with fleece works fine if cold and no wetness...prob under 20 deg f

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:49 pm
by kenshapiro2002
Sorry...no idea what you just said :lol: Sounds (PNW) like Maryland. So, what do I wear tomorrow (40 degrees) under those boarding pants? Just a wicking base like Under Armor (made in Baltimore, home of the Super Bowl headed Ravens)?
Ken

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:50 pm
by kenshapiro2002
Are my pants the "Gortex Shell" you speak of? Just shorts tomorrow?
Ken

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 3:39 pm
by runswithdog
Ken,
when it's that hot, try just a pair of running shorts,
non cotton, something that wicks.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 3:55 pm
by runswithdog
Long Under Armour under a regular pair of Bonfire pants will be WAY too hot at 40 degrees.
Most Bonfire pants are thick with plenty of insulation.
If you don't have running shorts, ---try a pair of board shorts,
ie. swim trunks.

A Goretex shell type of pants---- they are very thin, compared to insulated boarding pants. Do you have anything like that in your house? Good for high activity,mid warm to warmer days.... not freezing cold days.
If you are desperate for a lighter layer on bottom you can try a pair of wind pants, just nylon, like used for running or hiking or boating.
But you will get wet quickly if they are not Gore Tex.

IF you are still learning right, ---- (you're going to Wisp? Or 7 Springs, or Roundtop?------I used to live in Gaithersburg) your butt will be in the snow a lot, so go with the insulated layer on your butt, but then try "next to nothing" on your torso. A light fleece and a windbreaker or anorak.
That will at least let off some of that heat.
AND if the sun is out, you'lll get even hotter.
Oh yeah, I forgot , the sun never comes out in the East between November and March.
:)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:06 pm
by kenshapiro2002
Thanks...very helpful. I'm going to use Bike shorts (welcome the padding on the arse) under the insulated pants. Without you guys I'd have over dressed again. I;v been using my goose down jacket over a turtle neck (cotton) and thermal undershirt too...way too sweaty! Gonna just do the turtle and a fleece.

And yeah...Roundtop (tomorrow), Liberty or White Tail. Took my first board lesson at WISP a few weeks ago (skied for 36 years prior).
Ken

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:26 pm
by bernwern
Each person will react differently to different conditions. That being said, hear are my guidelines:

1) NO COTTON (this includes jeans). Cotton is a worthless fabric for snowboarding. It's R value is poor. It does not wick moisture, it absorbs it. It does not dry easily (take 5-6 times as long as fleece).

2) Get shell pants and jackets (no insulation). Make sure they have mesh-lined vents to open to dump heat, usually under the arms and inside your thighs. Cross venting is best. Make sure the fit is a little large, especially the pants (get some with belt-loops); you will need this room to layer.

3) When purchasing outerwear, don't be cheap. Get quality made and good ratings. Good quality will not only last you longer, but typically has a longer (or lifetime) warranty. I absolutely never recommend any gear rated under 10k/10k. Gore-Tex is preferred (if you can afford it) due to durability, functionality, and performance.

4) Learn to layer correctly. Start with solid thermals. Layer fleece next (fleece retains insulative properties even when wet). Layer wool last. With a good shell, wind won't penetrate so any retained moisture can be ignored.

5) Learn to regulate layers based on your body, temps, and riding. I start light (somewhat cold) because once I get rolling after a few runs I am plenty warm. Ideally, you want to get warm enough where you have to open vents occasionally to dump heat and moisture, but then seal up for the chair ride back to the top.

As an FYI, I typically ride with just my Under Armor 2.0 thermals under my shell pants and jacket.....and this goes from 0-40°F simply adjusting venting depending on conditions and temp. Below zero and I add a fleece layer (used to -38°F last season and was sweating). I have yet to add a wool layer!

Hope this helps everyone!

-B

PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:39 pm
by kenshapiro2002
Hey, the insulated Bonfires were free...gonna use them for awhile :lol: Thanks again for the information...very helpful.
Ken

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 9:22 am
by bernwern
^ free is the best kind :) Use what you have, as everyone starts that way. I still have all my old gear, but now it is reserve or borrowed out as friends need it.

-B

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 3:34 pm
by kenshapiro2002
Just got back. It was 36 degrees. Wore the insulated pants with only shorts underneath, and it was perfect. Only wore an Under Armour compression cold weather shirt under an unlined fleece and was also fine. Best news was the boarding. This was my third day out, and it all came together...able to do very long greens and link turns very nicely at decent speed without falling at all...very satisfying.
Ken

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:20 am
by bernwern
I used to wear basketball shorts on warm days....they work well enough. I also go commando on occasion, but then you can't really open the leg vents to dump heat. Just stay away from anything cotton for now...over the years you will gain a plethora of gear to choose from.

-B

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 5:19 pm
by John
Commando? What's that? You mean camo?

I once went riding with a guy who wore ski racing shorts over his thermals. Call it "men in tights."

When it's really warm, I'll wear the lightest pair of water-repellent pants I have. They don't have vents, though, but when the air is so warm that's a problem, the snow around here isn't worth riding for long.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 6:40 pm
by kenshapiro2002
John wrote:Commando? What's that? You mean camo?

I once went riding with a guy who wore ski racing shorts over his thermals. Call it "men in tights."

When it's really warm, I'll wear the lightest pair of water-repellent pants I have. They don't have vents, though, but when the air is so warm that's a problem, the snow around here isn't worth riding for long.


Hey John..."commando" is what you wear when going to the "john" :lol:
Ken

Re: What To Wear Under Boarding Pants

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:16 am
by volfan
My preference for a base layer is silk. Its light, comfy and surprisingly warm. Merino wool is great too. Don't overdress and get sweaty, then you'll get cold on the lift. I usually wear a long sleeve silk undershirt, light sweater of merino or fleece and a burton uninsulated shell. Volcom pants with vents to control temp. If its really cold/windy I wear a goretex marker jacket. Gore-tex is the best cold/wet weather material period, but its expensive. Underarmour compression gear is pretty nice too, sort of expensive but works well. If you wear a helmet, and you should, get it large enough to wear a liner under it. I have one from Heatsweats that wicks the moisture away and keeps my helmet from getting funky. I wear it under my bike helmet in the winter too. Not very insulated,but just enough to mitigate heat loss and keep my ears warm....and holds my earbuds in place too