(Still) Falling off chairlifts..

While lifts simplify our snowboarding lives by taking us up the mountain, using them can be a challenge. Talk about chair lifts, t-bars, and other lifts in this forum.

Postby daysailer1 » Fri May 16, 2008 8:15 pm

SteveH wrote:My "favorite" hairy unload is chair 2 at Loveland. The offload slope is steep and must run 25 yards before you get to a flat area. It's like doing a mini-run with the back foot unstrapped. Of course, people are falling constantly (even skiers can have trouble). Add the facts that it is not detachable so you come off fast and the cable angle is steep so you can't even see what you are going to run into (often literally) until the last second and it's a real recipe for disaster. I've ridden that chair a lot and still get nervous as I get near the top.

SteveH


Yeah, that's a bad one. It used to whig me out too. It is typically a very long, steep, icy unload. Four years of teaching at Loveland cured me of that. I don't have problem with it anymore. Keep your body over your board, align your upper body to the terrain, and get your COM over your engaged edge. I typically use my toe-side egde.
AASI - Rocky Mountain Cert. 1
Winter Park Ski & Ride School Adult Program
Winter Park Ski Bike Program Certified Instructor
daysailer1
 
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 2:28 pm
Location: Winter Park & Boulder County, CO

Postby IdahoRider » Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:14 pm

SteveH wrote:As a general observation, most folks I see having trouble off the lift don't get their weight far enough forward.
Steve


Right On, Steve...

What helped me was putting a second stomp pad on the deck. I stuck it right behind the front binding and this "extra" stomp pad is just for unloading...Using this binding plus bending my knees a little and sliding my hips forward not only lets me stay upright while getting off a lift but it is surprising how well you can steer too.
Ed
aka IdahoRider
aka G.O.A.T. (Gray On A Tray)
Sandpoint, ID
IdahoRider
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 4:54 pm
Location: Idaho Panhandle

Postby wrathfuldeity » Sat Oct 25, 2008 5:41 am

getting off the chair:
1. ready yourself by scooting half off the seat, the front half of your hind hanging in the air.
2. have your board pointing straight forward.
3. as you stand, stand straight-up but relaxed, knees slightly bent with your center of gravity over the center of the board (don't bend over or have your butt sticking out...stinky butt), firmly place your rear foot on the stomp pad without looking, look straight ahead same direction as your board...as if merely gazing at the lovely mountians (do not look at the ground or your feet...otherwise you will fall down), put your rear or trailing hand on the chairlift seat just to steady yourself as you stand up and glide off.
4. just glide straight and don't try to turn or slow down and just let the board naturally slow down (after you're get better, you can use your toe of your rear foot to hang a little over the toeside about 1 inch and then as you are slowing just gently press your toes down to slow down and it will gently turn you toeside).
5. As you gracefully stop, smile and wave like the queen, strap-in without sitting down (by setting your heel edge, bend over and let them see your impact shorts) and fly down the hill like a mad pow cow. muhahaahaaa...moo
Baker!
wrathfuldeity
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:52 am
Location: Bellingham, WA

Postby PamelaDare » Sun Oct 26, 2008 10:57 pm

It all seems to simple; so why the nerves when it comes time to disembark?

While gender and a little middle age have given me 'something to fall back on' I'm still keen to master the chair lift. I am simply tired off of the lift and tumbling all over yonder, especially when it is busy.

I'm sure I'll get it this season at some point.

:)
PamelaDare
 
Posts: 149
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:46 pm

Postby John » Mon Oct 27, 2008 9:07 am

Pamela,

You just may have to be a maniac about it. I certainly fell my share of times, but an even bigger challenge was the tow rope, which was what they used at the newbie area where I learned. If Lucile Ball ever learned how to snowboard, she would have looked like me on that day. Or actually, two or three days. That's how long it took me to get to the top of the bunny hill using the rope.

But I would not be denied. I kept at it. Again. Again. Again. And again. Eventually it clicked. Maybe the same thing will happen to you.
John
 
Posts: 821
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 2:02 pm
Location: Minnesota

Postby shikshak » Tue Nov 25, 2008 10:18 am

wrathfuldeity wrote:getting off the chair:
1. ready yourself by scooting half off the seat, the front half of your hind hanging in the air.
2. have your board pointing straight forward.
3. as you stand, stand straight-up but relaxed, knees slightly bent with your center of gravity over the center of the board (don't bend over or have your butt sticking out...stinky butt), firmly place your rear foot on the stomp pad without looking, look straight ahead same direction as your board...as if merely gazing at the lovely mountians (do not look at the ground or your feet...otherwise you will fall down), put your rear or trailing hand on the chairlift seat just to steady yourself as you stand up and glide off.
4. just glide straight and don't try to turn or slow down and just let the board naturally slow down (after you're get better, you can use your toe of your rear foot to hang a little over the toeside about 1 inch and then as you are slowing just gently press your toes down to slow down and it will gently turn you toeside).
5. As you gracefully stop, smile and wave like the queen, strap-in without sitting down (by setting your heel edge, bend over and let them see your impact shorts) and fly down the hill like a mad pow cow. muhahaahaaa...moo


The chair lift was tough for me, especially if it wasn't an express quad with a flat run-out. I would agree with everything said above, with one more added tip: I put my hand under my back butt cheek on the seat and use that to help me balance while standing up. it helps me stand up faster and get balanced before sliding. I also used to have my back leg touching the seat (perpendicularly) with my hand on the seat-that helps with balance. And then the chair would push me to get started.

Overall, the thing that helped the most was trying not to get psyched out about the chair! And if you're on a chair with other people-stay on the outside (I prefer facing the other people) and let them know you'll be going straight-most folks are ok with whatever you need to do to get off the lift if they're warned!

There is tho, one lift at Pico that I haven't yet figured out. Sometimes there are snowmobiles right where I want to go. In that case, I've just learned to fall out of the way!
shikshak
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 7:14 pm
Location: near Pico, VT

Postby PamelaDare » Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:54 am

I have always had a tendency to try and sit on the right side of the lift chair--perhaps this is why I am always falling into people(or away as to avoid a collision) I ride right foot forward.

But balance is quite important, as it attempting all of this when the lift isn't too congested.
A hard feat when you are dealing with limited snowfall in the East; when it snows, everyone tries their best to make the most of the conditions.
PamelaDare
 
Posts: 149
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:46 pm

Postby John » Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:07 pm

Yup, if you're riding right-foot forward (goofy) and chairs give you troubles, it might be best if you sit on the left side of the chair, especially if you're more comfortable going toeside than heelside. Even though I'm an advanced rider, I still find it easier to dismount in a way that prompts my ride out to be, if anything, toeside rather than heelside.
John
 
Posts: 821
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 2:02 pm
Location: Minnesota

Postby MunkySpunk » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:49 pm

PamelaDare wrote:I have always had a tendency to try and sit on the right side of the lift chair--perhaps this is why I am always falling into people(or away as to avoid a collision) I ride right foot forward.

But balance is quite important, as it attempting all of this when the lift isn't too congested.
A hard feat when you are dealing with limited snowfall in the East; when it snows, everyone tries their best to make the most of the conditions.
I'm goofy footed too. I find it easiest to sit on the left side of the chair. That way, once I'm standing, I find the support pole (the vertical one) of the chair is right there for me to push off of with my left hand. I can manage on the right side of the chair, but given a choice, I prefer the left. The way the mechanics of the situation work out, dismounting from the left and pushing with the left hand leaves you further from the other people. As for somewhere in the middle - forget it, I don't even bother, I just wait for the next chair and get to one of the sides. I could probably hack it, but what's the point in finding out until you really have to?

I don't know what your issue is, but I can bet at least 50% of it is that you're so nervous that you're probably panicking because you fell the last time, which is making you bail this time, which makes you fall again, which makes you nervous for the next time before you even get on the chair...etc..etc.. It's a vicious circle.

Nobody can tell you what's going on for 100% sure unless we actually see you bite it while unloading. All we can do is give advice as to what works best for us (and it sounds like this isn't helping much). Do you go with any buddies? Can they go up several chairs before you, turn around, and film you doing a half-gainer down the dismount slope? If you don't have anyone, can you ask a nice older skier who doesn't look like he'd steal your camera for help? Can you post it so we can watch what's going on?

Barring that, I'm on the East Coast. I'll practically be living at Jiminy Peak this season, if you feel like stopping by, drop me a PM and I can help you. I'll also be going to a couple other places in the East this winter, but nothing is set in stone.
- Old age and treachery always overcome youth and skill
MunkySpunk
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:51 am

Postby wrathfuldeity » Tue Nov 25, 2008 2:06 pm

One thing that hasn't been mentioned, is pay attention to your shoulders and hips as you glide off...you want them parallel or "closed" with the board (and the board pointing straight down the fall line)...so in essence you are looking at the horizon over your leading shoulder. It might also help to grab your trailing pant leg with your trailing hand so that you don't open up your shoulders. Remember to shift your hips forward toward the nose to weight the nose...don't lean back into the "back seat." Anyway just a thought.
Baker!
wrathfuldeity
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:52 am
Location: Bellingham, WA

Postby MunkySpunk » Wed Nov 26, 2008 9:18 am

Which is precisely my point. Pamela's already nervous as h*ll about the chairlift (it's like her personal version of Charlie Brown's kite-eating tree). And here all of us are throwing advice at her: no less than 47 specific steps, self-checks, angles, balancing acts, and pieces of advice that she has to keep in mind while she's in a half-panic brought on by a 20-ton steel monster and 5 other chairlift passengers right ontop of her. It's very well intentioned advice, I'll attest, but the sheer volume has to be overwhelming.

Are you falling the moment you leave the chair, are you gliding a few feet and wiping, are you gliding a few feet, panicking and bailing (purposely wiping) because you feel it's the safest thing to do, are you just not standing up all the way? Are you missing your stomp pad? Is the chair tagging you in the back? Is it something none of us have even thought of? etc...etc..??

Actually watching what's going on will be a giant help.. at least, that's how I feel.
- Old age and treachery always overcome youth and skill
MunkySpunk
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:51 am

Postby Rob » Fri Jan 02, 2009 7:57 pm

IdahoRider wrote:
What helped me was putting a second stomp pad on the deck. I stuck it right behind the front binding and this "extra" stomp pad is just for unloading...Using this binding plus bending my knees a little and sliding my hips forward not only lets me stay upright while getting off a lift but it is surprising how well you can steer too.


So I tried Ed's second stomp pad, but I found that with all my weight in front of the board's center, the board tended to fishtail on the unload. But I definitely find that his and others' suggestion to shift weight forward as you get off the chair is an important key to unloading from a chairlift. I nailed them all yesterday. Thanks for a really useful thread.
Rob
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:41 pm
Location: Bay Area, California

Postby Guest » Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:01 am

Rob wrote:
IdahoRider wrote:What helped me was putting a second stomp pad on the deck. I stuck it right behind the front binding and this "extra" stomp pad is just for unloading...Using this binding plus bending my knees a little and sliding my hips forward not only lets me stay upright while getting off a lift but it is surprising how well you can steer too.

So I tried Ed's second stomp pad, but I found that with all my weight in front of the board's center, the board tended to fishtail on the unload.

Hi Rob-

I am not sure what is causing the fishtailing. Thinking about it, all I can come up with is maybe you could try flexing the knees a bit deeper. That might help shift the center of gravity back towards the center just enough. This is probably one of those things that everybody has to fiddle with until they find the technique that works best for them. I have been riding this year on a different board than what I had been using the last couple of years, and I set it up with two stomp pads also. So far, so good. Seems to be working fine on the unloads. I did set the forward stomp pad aft of the front binding by about an inch and a half, so its not hard up against it, but still forward of center. Well, let us know what finally works for you. I would be interested to hear.

Keep it sideways!
Guest
 

second stomp pad

Postby IdahoRider » Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:08 am

whoops...forgot to sign in before posting my reply to Rob. I'll be sure to get my signature on this one :lol:

Just thought I would add that the stomp pads I am using this year are the disks with a single raised bar crossing the center. I aligned the center bar with my binding angles.
Ed
aka IdahoRider
aka G.O.A.T. (Gray On A Tray)
Sandpoint, ID
IdahoRider
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 4:54 pm
Location: Idaho Panhandle

Postby justdust » Sun Mar 08, 2009 8:59 pm

I have found that no matter how much I develop my skills, I still fall getting off (and sometimes on) the chair lift. I've had many days where my one and only fall all day is on the lift. It happened today. My son and I were alone in line to get on a nice gentle quad, and a ski instructor asked if one of her group of 5 year olds could ride with us. I said sure and of course, the brand new skier had no trouble at all and I fell down getting of the lift for no reason whatsoever. :oops: I've decided that falling where the maximum number of people are crowded around to witness is just nature's attempt to keep me humble. Rather than fight it, I've decided to learn to fall in the most graceful, least stressful and contorted manner possible. In other words, when I am falling, I just relax and go with it, then stand up and move out of the way and don't give it another thought. :roll:
justdust
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:30 pm
Location: Albany, New York

PreviousNext

Return to Techniques: Using Lifts



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron