ACL-MCL injury

Dealing with aches and pains--and better yet, avoiding them--and fitness related to snowboarding. This is also the place to talk about helmets, safety pads, and goggles.

ACL-MCL injury

Postby PamelaDare » Thu Feb 26, 2009 1:37 pm

Is anyone riding with a mild ACL/MCL injury? I hurt myself exiting my car awhile back and while things seem to be fine, I am concerned about re-straining (not tearing, thank goodness) these delicate muscles in and around the knee.

I have heard about some kind of OTC bracing that could be worn while riding to ensure a bit more stability and to guard against incorrect rotation.

Can anyone shed some light on this?


Thanks

P
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Postby canoer » Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:28 pm

My wife just suffered a tib/fib break on her leg while wearing her fancy brace that she got after her ACL repair last year. But she was skiing - no one gets hurt boarding right? (How's it going, Leftcoast Larry?)

Women over 50 are more likely to have a tib/fib than any other injury apparently (skiing or otherwise). Not that you've hit that landmark, but she has. But you have to wonder if wearing the fiberglass brace concentrated any forces in an otherwise rather mundane fall.

My riding buddy wears a simple Velcro-type neoprene brace and he says it gives him a bit of extra confidence with his "trick" knee. My wife used to wear one of those slip on neoprene braces, but still managed to tear her ACL and meniscus.

Anyway, my feeling from dealing with her rehab is to find a physical therapist that you like and trust and get their advice and maybe even get them to teach you how to wear a brace, if they recommend one. If you can find one that rides, even better.
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Postby PamelaDare » Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:54 pm

i've been looking everywhere for some information pertaining to ACL/MCL injuiries and braces and haven't been able to find much FOR SNOWBOARDING. (Skiing mechanics are different so I'm being careful to find something that will allow me the right amount of correct movement)

If I find a reasonable brace,I might be able to enjoy some western riding in the next week or so. Without it, I simply don't think I"d be comfortable enough to ride.

One of the advantages of not being twenty one and reckless I suppose...:0)

P.
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Postby SteveH » Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:09 pm

When my knee was feeling a bit unstable a while back I used a neoprene brace with metal lateral support. Keeps the knee from bending in directions it should not go. kneeshop.com has a large selection.

It's great advice to find a professional to help with the selection and use, but such folks are rare and difficult to find in my experience. If you feel you can't ride without the brace and don't have a readily available professional I would pick something that looks right and give it a try.

As for the tib/fib vulnerability, it sounds like the brace involved had the hard cuff at the shin which provides a stress point for a break. The neoprene braces are just velcro straps and would not provide anywhere near that level of force on the lower leg.
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Postby canoer » Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:53 am

Yeah, for the skier with a repaired knee, it's a lousy trade-off between supporting the knee and putting additional stress on the typical boot-top fracture location. But I digress.

My boarding neighbor's neoprene/Velcro brace has no metal parts and thus no other support. I think the biggest benefit of that one and the sleeves you slip on are that they keep your knee warm and perhaps help with the circulation.

Another site that looks like it has good info for the d-i-y'er on self-fitting a brace is Donjoy.com. Not cheap (but neither is surgery!).

Finding professionals who ride to help with fitment may not be as hard these days though - the CNA that worked with my wife during her hospital stay is a boarding ski patroller and is a nut on the rails. We met him in the First Aid hut and then he showed up for duty in her room the next day.
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Postby PamelaDare » Mon Mar 02, 2009 1:45 pm

I'm just concerned about reinjuring the MCL. If I don't feel safe, I'll be back to my life as a fixture on the holiday beach chair down south ' someplace. :0)

:)
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Postby daysailer1 » Tue Mar 03, 2009 1:23 pm

I've had two front knee (left) surgeries.

The last thing I want to do is to stretch out the repaired MCL and have another surgery. I ride with a customized Donjoy metal/fiberglass kneebrace. The insurance company I had then paid for the brace 100%.

Most of the older skiers and riders in our locker room use some form of a durable fiberglass brace for an injured knee. You'd be surprised at what we wear under those uniforms to prevent injuries.
AASI - Rocky Mountain Cert. 1
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Postby PamelaDare » Sat Mar 07, 2009 5:37 pm

canoer wrote:Yeah, for the skier with a repaired knee, it's a lousy trade-off between supporting the knee and putting additional stress on the typical boot-top fracture location. But I digress.

My boarding neighbor's neoprene/Velcro brace has no metal parts and thus no other support. I think the biggest benefit of that one and the sleeves you slip on are that they keep your knee warm and perhaps help with the circulation.

Another site that looks like it has good info for the d-i-y'er on self-fitting a brace is Donjoy.com. Not cheap (but neither is surgery!).

Finding professionals who ride to help with fitment may not be as hard these days though - the CNA that worked with my wife during her hospital stay is a boarding ski patroller and is a nut on the rails. We met him in the First Aid hut and then he showed up for duty in her room the next day.


Everyone seems to a skier and/or is quite experienced with skier and hockey type injuries. Considering the stats on injuries to riders who pickup the sport later, you think someone would have put together some general guidelines for us to follow.

Met with someone last week who actually laughed when I told him why I was there and what I was looking for. 'You should take up skiing--it's safer." I left ,of course, but I was quite miffed.

The Neophrene may actually be what I'm ofter. I"ll give that a go and forget the ubertechie products at this time. There is such a thing as being too careful and I suspect that is one of the reasons after all of this time I still ride like a second day beginner....
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Postby canoer » Sat Mar 07, 2009 10:12 pm

>you think someone would have put together some
>general guidelines for us to follow.

Sounds like a good summer project for you! :wink:
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